Rockies All-Time Home Run Leaders: The Top 25

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The Rockies all time home run leaders list is a who’s who of the best power hitters in franchise history. While the top three made their respective marks in this department in the earlier, pre-humidor days at Coors Field, the latter portion of the top five includes a couple of more recent faces of the franchise who are no longer with the organization. We’ll also list out the remainder of the top 25.

After you’re done checking this out, be sure to also take a peek at the Rockies’ single-season home run leaderboard.

Rockies All Time Home Run Leaders: Top 5

Todd Helton: 369 Home Runs

Although he has to share honors with a teammate in one category, Todd Helton is one of the few sluggers who are among the team-specific all-time home run leaders while also holding the single-season home run record for that same club.

Helton enjoyed six seasons of 30-plus homers during his 17-year MLB career, and each of those occurrences came consecutively between 1999 and 2004. The numbers he racked up in 2000 and 2001 are just insane, though. While he nearly had two straight 200-hit performances, the first baseman did post consecutive seasons of 50 doubles, 40 homers, and 140 RBI, all with an OPS of at least 1.100.

The left-handed hitter placed fifth in NL MVP voting in 2000, but he managed to lead the league in hits (216), doubles (59), RBI (147), batting average (.372), on-base percentage (.463), slugging percentage (.698), OPS (1.162), and total bases (405).

Larry Walker: 258 Home Runs

Hall of Famer Larry Walker is the guy Helton shares the Rockies’ single-season home run record with since he hit 49 homers in his NL MVP campaign of 1997. That year began a ridiculous five-year stretch when it came to Walker’s batting average. He won three batting titles during this period and finished with an average of at least .350 four times.

This period spanned 2,674 plate appearances. During that time, Walker slashed .357/.445/.658 with an average of 31 homers, 35 doubles, 97 RBI, and 107 runs scored. That’s quite the peak performance, don’t you think?

Although his OPS was slightly higher in 1997, Walker’s slash line in 1999 was his best in a number of ways. It finished up at .379/.458/.710, and he led the league in each of those categories. The outfielder posted a monthly batting average below .348 just once (it was .326 in July). And, for those wondering, his slash line at Coors (.461/.531/.879) was much different than it was on the road (.286/.375/.519).

Vinny Castilla: 239 Home Runs

As long as Vinny Castilla suited up for a full season’s worth of games with the Rockies, you could pencil that man in for at least 30 homers. He did it during each season between 1995 and 1999 and even did it again when he came back for one more year in 2004 as a 36-year-old. The period that stands out the most here is 1996 through 1998, which were his only performances of 40-plus homers in the major leagues.

His ’96 and ’97 seasons were nearly identical. He hit 40 homers and collected 113 RBI in each campaign, while his line in ’96 (.304/.343/.548) was almost exactly the same as the following year (.304/.356/.547). The 1998 campaign was when Castilla finally did something a little different, upping his power numbers to 46 homers and 144 RBI to go along with a .319/.362/.589 line.

Castilla was a career .333 at Coors Field, with 132 of his total homers coming in that stadium.

Nolan Arenado: 235 Home Runs

As long as Nolan Arenado didn’t exercise the opt-out clause in his contract following the 2022 season, he was a lock to overtake Helton at the top of the Rockies’ all-time leaderboard. But of course, that wasn’t meant to be since Colorado traded him following the 2020 campaign.

Even though he won’t get that distinction here, he made his mark during an eight-year run with the organization. He at least held a share of the NL lead in home runs three times in a four-year span and racked up at least 37 dingers each year between 2015 and 2019.

During this time, Arenado was essentially automatic for the following things: 30 homers, 110 RBI, 100 runs scored, an All-Star Game appearance, a Silver Slugger award, a Gold Glove award, and a top-10 NL MVP finish. Who knows what could’ve been if he stayed in Denver for at least another couple of seasons before opting out, but it seems like he’s doing just fine with the St. Louis Cardinals.

Carlos Gonzalez: 227 Home Runs

Carlos Gonzalez is one of the many dudes that I could watch swing a bat for hours and legitimately not get bored. It’s just so beautiful — I can’t take my eyes off it when CarGo is on my screen. Gonzalez won two Silver Sluggers and appeared in three All-Star Games during his career, but his best overall performance came in 2010.

The sweet-swinging left-handed hitter won the batting title with a .336 average and paired that with a league-leading 197 hits, as well as 34 home runs, 117 RBI, and 111 runs scored. He took home one of his Silver Sluggers in this campaign, and it was accompanied by his first of three Gold Glove awards. And even though he didn’t earn a trip to the midsummer classic, he placed third in NL MVP voting behind Joey Votto and Albert Pujols.

Gonzalez’s power numbers in the first half (17 homers, 60 RBI) were nearly identical to his second-half production (17 homers, 57 RBI). However, his batting line went from .314/.346/.532 prior to the All-Star break to .363/.412/.679 after it. He did do a lot of that damage at Coors, as 26 of his homers happened in front of the home fans while hitting .380 in Denver.

Rockies All Time Home Run Leaders: The Rest

Here’s what the rest of the Rockies’ top-25 career home run leaders looks like:

If you’re interested in seeing which hitters are on the outside looking in, check out the full list on FanGraphs.

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